Entering the lower lever of the TARDIS tomb, when Clara asked the Doctor if he loved River Song, he replied: "She was clever and brave and kind and funny. And had more love in one heart than I could ever have in two." Draft Script of The Name of the Doctor (DWM Guide)

Entering the lower lever of the TARDIS tomb, when Clara asked the Doctor if he loved River Song, he replied: "She was clever and brave and kind and funny. And had more love in one heart than I could ever have in two." Draft Script of The Name of the Doctor (DWM Guide)

swprequelframes:

I’d much rather dream about Padmé.

The Love Story between Anakin Skywalker and Padmé Amidala is … exceptional. Although it certainly borrows in its presentation  from classical love stories like Romeo and Julia or Tristan and Iseult, it is still unconventional for contemporary cinema’s take on love stories in many ways and also vastly different from Han and Leia.

For a large part, it turns audience expectations in terms of gender roles on its head. In the vast majority of contemporary love relationships, the man (in a relationship and before) is portrayed as being in control and strong, whereas the women is much more emotional(ly longing) and attached. With Anakin and Padmé, however, it’s the complete opposite. In their situation, Anakin is the emotionally  vulnerbale, more longing person who’s desperately looking for love. Padmé, on the other hand, is the more rational one who is  in control and up to decide whether the two of them will be a couple or not.

That’s quite uncommon (and I think in part the reason why a lot of male geeks can’t handle it), but I find it pretty refreshing. I liked seeing a male character that was vulnerable in regard to “love” and I liked to see a women who could make the final decision. In that sense, the beginning of Attack Of The Clones is quite telling:There are plenty of shots that show Anakin longing for Padmé. She’s hsi dream, and in his dreams.

It was a dream. (Bad?) Like the ones I used to have about my mother just before she died. (And?) It was about you. You die in childbirth.

This. All of this. Twice over, and then in the morning.

Anonymous asked:

Whats your opinion about the randy taraborelli book?i mean he said that mj used a cream to bleach his skin and he started ALL this 'wacko jacko' thing by hiself.

itsjustdesire:

emrosethedisneymjsherlokifangirl:

michael-jackson-imagines:

itsjustdesire:

It’s B.S.
But MJ did use bleaching creams late in his vitiligo treatment but that’s because he had no choice. His skin was gradually becoming lighter and he still had dark blotches, so he had to even those out so that his skin would be completely light all over. It would never go back to its original color because he had Vitiligo.
Fans like to state that MJ didn’t bleach his skin because he wanted to be white and that’s the truth. But he DID bleach it for treatment purposes.
And as for the Wacko Jacko thing, I doubt MJ started that.

To add on to that, the whole ‘Wacko Jacko’ thing was started by a British tabloid.

Jermaine said in his book that Michael NEVER bleached his skin. Maybe Michael used medical creams, but I don’t think they really count as skin “bleaching” products (when I think “skin bleaching” I think cosmetics and not medicine, but that’s just my opinion).

there are prescription skin bleaching creams, specifically for certain skin diseases

The goal of depigmentation is to unify skin color in patients with vitiligo virtually all over the body and those who have failed PUVA, who cannot use PUVA, or who reject the PUVA option”

The end-stage color of skin bleached with Benoquin is the same chalk-white as the vitiligo macules”

Reversal of the white spots and restoration of normal skin color is therefore the primary hope for all these disfigured vitiligo patients.”

and I got that from the American Vitiligo Research Foundation website

And he couldn’t undertake PUVA treatment on account of his photo-sensitivity due to his Discoid Lupus.